From January to October 2019, only 190 people made donations to Glorian. Do your part.
glossary

medusa3Greek Μεδουσα, "guardian, queen (medeôn)"

"Perseus was the son of Jupiter and Danae. His grandfather Acrisius, alarmed by an oracle which had told him that his daughter's child would be the instrument of his death, caused the mother and child to be shut up in a chest and set adrift on the sea. The chest floated towards Seriphus, where it was found by a fisherman who conveyed the mother and infant to Polydectes, the king of the country, by whom they were treated with kindness. When Perseus was grown up Polydectes sent him to attempt the conquest of Medusa, a terrible monster who had laid waste the country. She was once a beautiful maiden whose hair was her chief glory but as she dared to vie in beauty with Minerva, the goddess deprived her of her charms and changed her beautiful ringlets into hissing serpents. She became a cruel monster of so frightful an aspect that no living thing could behold her without being turned into stone. All around the cavern where she dwelt might be seen the stony figures of men and animals which had chanced to catch a glimpse of her and had been petrified with the sight. Perseus, favoured by Minerva and Mercury, the former of whom lent him her shield and the latter his winged shoes, approached Medusa while she slept and taking care not to look directly at her, but guided by her image reflected in the bright shield which he bore, he cut off her head and gave it to Minerva, who fixed it in the middle of her AEgis." —Thomas Bulfinch, The Age of Fable

"Perseus descends in order to cut off the head of Medusa (the psychological “I,” or terrestrial Adam) with his flaming sword; Medusa’s head has many planted serpents which the esoteric student has to deliver to Minerva, the goddess of wisdom... Remember that Medusa is the maiden of evil (the psychological “I”), whose head is covered with hissing vipers." —Samael Aun Weor, Tarot and Kabbalah

QUOTE OF THE DAY

"Comprehension does not belong to the past nor to the future; comprehension belongs to the moment in which we are living, here and now..."