As the student aspires for Truth, he discovers that he has definitely penetrated other spheres of Consciousness than those with which he is familiar in the daily expression of his ordinary life.

He slowly becomes acquainted with many different divisions of nature, of which formerly he had been ignorant, and he begins to realize that his body has become a sounding board upon which the different vibrations of nature’s movements play intermittently. New worlds appear before his vision and, if he is earnestly seeking the light, he discovers the inhabitants of several of the divisions of nature and gradually learns to associate himself with their different degrees of intelligence and attunes himself with their vibrations.

His body becomes the instrument which puts him en rapport with the intelligences who are the governing powers in nature’s kingdom. The “engineer” atom within his body signals to him when he is in tune with a being of the deva creation, and he “listens in” to the communications which immediately come to him, while aspiring for truth at the same time, and thus with a higher clairvoyance he sees and tests each source of information. In other words, the student should see the being he is in communication with, and by the radiation of its light test its degree of knowledge.

When the student goes inwardly and draws himself away from the objective world, he instantly recognizes the forces which wish to communicate with him. Purifying his mind, he “listens in” to the communications coming through. Nature has become his instructor and he has no need to go into his ordinary world of experience for knowledge. He earnestly aspires for the greater wisdom which these instructors in nature may reveal to him.

The reader may wish to know what type of instruction is supplied by these angelic devas of nature. They instruct him in the purposes of nature. For instance, the student may ask himself, “What is the meaning of an oak tree, what part it plays in the manifestation of nature, and what relationship it has to the human kingdom?” As he analyzes its form and its purpose he asks himself other questions, “What does it symbolize?” “What is the purpose of its creation?” “What use is it to humanity?” “What are the characteristics which differentiate it from other species?” “What relationship it has to the animal world?” “To air, fire, and water?” “What relationship it has to other species, such as the tall sycamore, and the drooping willow?” “How does its purpose and manifestation become known to the human Consciousness?”

The asking of such questions sets in motion that process which will in time attune him to the deva intelligence.

It is the deva instructors who give us this information and they will approach us when, by right thinking and right action, we have purified the elemental nature within us. The body is a constantly evolving structure, either becoming more refined and pure, or degenerating in density and sluggishness.

In this process of refinement the student first becomes conscious of the intelligence which is symbolized in the “water” of his nature. Although previously he may have been slightly “aware,” he now becomes conscious of nature’s instruction. In his youth the writer was greatly impressed with a tribe of American Indians with whom he lived during a whole summer. Whilst walking with some of the “wise men” of the tribe he noticed that one would suddenly stop, cross his arms upon his breast, and with great veneration “listen in” to something which had escaped the writer’s notice. It took the writer a year and nine months living close to nature, before he began to apprehend nature’s movements and instruction.

Gradually he learned that nature, through her broadcasting station, often heralds forth to man glad tidings of the presence of a great teacher, whom the Indians call the “Child of God.” The great teachers of humanity, whether in the body or out of the body, often herald their approach by the coming of a devic form.

When the deva wishes to attract the attention of the student, he projects into the Consciousness of the student some form, as of a seagull, bird, swan, deer, or a beaver. A red Indian initiate will often say, “The king of the beavers is about to speak,” and it is from this source that the Indian gets his knowledge of the laws of the beavers. These laws show how men should live. They are a canon of human conduct and, among the Indians, the different degrees of intelligence are symbolically summed up by saying, “He belongs to the ‘beaver’ lodge, or to the ‘blue bird’ lodge.”

Many sensitives have been conscious of that movement in nature which announces the approach of the dawn, called by the Greeks, Aurora, the herald of the dawn. As God gives of his bounty to the human body, in the fruits of the earth, so do the heralds of the dawn give a mental stimulation of splendor and brightness to those who attune themselves by “going inwardly” to receive their message of the day.

In time humanity will await eagerly the announcement of God’s messengers for the day’s instruction in music and in beauty. Our greatest composers have touched only the fringe of nature’s symphony, and eventually the radio and the other toys which God has given to man through science, will become refuse heaps of twisted wire and discarded mechanism, for in time man is to know and enjoy God.

The ascetic in his cave is often pitied by civilization’s bright wits. They think he must be very lonely; whereas, in the deeper states of Yoga practice nature unfolds herself and the ascetic listens to symphonies greater than the ear of man has ever heard. It is well to seek union with the Lord God of Truth within, so that nature may reveal herself and man become an artist, conscious of his own creator—the Lord God of Truth within. When he so becomes conscious, he quickly realizes that his objective world is but a sphere of illusion, like a dream. It is in the illusion world that magic is encountered.

A great deal has been written about magic. People who cannot produce any tangible proof talk about it with authority. The true magician is a seeker after Truth, and as he perfects himself he begins to discern in nature her wonderful unfoldment. In proportion as he merits Truth, nature rewards him with a knowledge of her secrets and gives him dominion over some small division of her Consciousness. This is in order to enable him to perfect himself in the government and knowledge of her constructive principles. In recognition of his worth and onepointedness of mind in seeking the Truth within, there is a guardian appointed to instruct him in nature’s phenomena. He is rewarded by attaining to a greater or less degree of knowledge of nature’s law, and the deva becomes his guardian spirit, allowing him to use nature’s materials within a certain range of authority. It is only when Truth appears to the mind—when primordial light, through devotion to Truth, descends—that man is given his first real lesson regarding the cause of things—the knowledge of the laws of cause and effect. But the student must constantly aspire for truth and purity of thought, before the Lords of the mind and of the deva creation will enter into a close relationship with him for, as the devas say, “The mind must be bound through merit, which is at the disposal of the Gods.”

The student must enter into the Consciousness of the real “mind body” of nature. This means passing over the void from the material world into the mind just back of nature, as well as detachment from all things which would agitate or keep back ascertainment of the truth of a thing.

 

Quote of the Day

"The first teaching that comes from nature is to stand alone. Do not depend upon the assistance of others for your well-being..."