The Mystery of the Golden Blossom, a book by Samael Aun Weor

The Ego of Sorcery

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The wise author of the book Specimen of British Writers, Barnett, presents an extraordinary case of sorcery:

“Fifty years ago there was an old woman who lived in a village in the county of Somerset and who was generally considered to be a witch.

“Her body was withered and bent over with age, and she walked on crutches.

“Her voice was cavernous and mysterious but feigned solemnity.  A penetrating gleam sprang from her eyes, which left anyone upon whom she gazed silenced by fear.

“Unexpectedly a healthy young man of about twenty-one years of age and from the same locality began to have persistent nightmares that affected his health.  Within three or four months he became pale, weak and thin, with all the symptoms of a life that was about to drain away.

“Neither he nor his family and friends doubted the cause, and after getting some advice, he decided to keep watch for the witch.

“The following night, at about half past eleven, he noticed some soft, stealthy steps on the stairs.

“Once the frightening being had arrived in the room, she went to the foot of the bed, climbed upon it and slowly dragged herself towards the young man.

“He allowed her to reach his knees and then seized her hair with both hands, holding her with convulsive strength.  At the same time he called to his mother, who slept in the next room, to bring a light.

“While his mother went to look for a light, the young man and the unknown being were struggling in the darkness; both of them rolling violently about on the floor.  When the first glimmer of light appeared on the stairs, the woman broke loose from him with supernatural strength and disappeared from his sight in a flash.

“The mother found her son standing, still panting from his efforts and holding tufts of hair in each of his hands.

“When this phenomenon was related to me,” says Barnett, “out of curiosity I asked the young man from where he had gotten the hair.” The answer was, ‘It was clumsy of me not to have managed to keep hold of her; it would have better proved the identity of the person.

“‘However, during the whirl of sensations, I made her fall to the floor, and the witch, whose hair I still had hold of, was very careful not to appear in my sight again nor to come to trouble me at night anymore because she received a very good thrashing.’

“‘It was strange,’ he added, ‘that while I held on, struggling with her, even though I knew who she was, her breathing and her whole body seemed to be that of a young girl.’

“The man who experienced this occurrence is still alive; he has recounted this episode to me more than once; besides, I can certify to the authenticity of the matter, believe what you like.”

Commenting on this case the wise Waldemar says:

“This account contains two important points: First, the young man knew for sure that his nightmare was caused by the witch who lived nearby.  He knew this witch from brief encounters during the day and at night in her astral visits.

“Second, the witch, bent over as she was by age and supported by crutches, transformed herself over several months into the image of a sprightly young girl, while he was getting weaker and wasting away.  Where could the cause for the evident rejuvenation of the old woman lie?

“To answer this question,” continues Waldemar, “we must keep in mind the mechanism of the Eidolon, the double.

“If the aura that surrounds and envelops human beings also represents an accurate reflection of the body in such a way that its defects and weaknesses can be found to correspond exactly, the ‘double body’ presents increased evidence, so to speak, which as an example can often be seen in seriously wounded people who, years after a limb has been amputated, can feel intense pain as though that limb still existed.

“This invincible character of the double body is based on the ‘creator principle,’ in that the form given by Nature, innate to the being, is contained in a kind of primary germ.

“In this, as in the acorn within which the structure of a complete tree is contained, the living image of its being is concealed.

“Through many false actions and deviations, the vibrant astral tissue which is connected to the primitive body reflects itself during life’s course.”

With regard to “primitive bodies” we would like to point out that, in 1955, Professor Hans Spemann of the University of Edinburgh received the Nobel Prize for Medicine and Psychology in transcendental studies for verification of the existence of an active sculptor of life, a “chemical ideo-plastic” that forms the protoplasm according to a predetermined image during the first stages of embryonic development.

From the results of Spemann’s studies, Professor Oscar E. Shotte of Yale University managed to demonstrate through experiments with salamanders that the sculptor of life does not disappear in any way during embryonic development, as Spemann had thought, but is present throughout the whole life of the individual.

According to Shotte, a small piece of tissue from a normal human wound, grafted onto living, virgin territory could completely reconstruct a creature identical to the wounded person in question. Maybe laboratory experiments in cloning could one day, in unsuspected proportion, reproduce the results of Professor Shotte.

It is obvious that the abominable harpy of this gory story could, through a certain “modus operandi” that is unknowable to the crowds, soak up, absorb through a kind of vampirism, the vitality of the young man and transplant it within her own “primitive body.”  Only in this way can the unusual rejuvenation of the old woman’s body be scientifically explained.

Unquestionably, the “chemical ideo-plastic” once impregnated by the vitality of the young man, managed to reconstruct the debilitated organism of the old woman. While the youth’s life drained horribly, the deadly old woman of left-hand Witch’s Sabbaths was regaining her lost youth.

Clearly, the young man could have captured her if he had not made the mistake of seizing her by the hair; it would have been better to grasp her waist or arms.

Many of these abysmal harpies have been captured by other procedures when taken by surprise.

Some ancient traditions say: “If you put a pair of steel scissors on the ground in the shape of a cross and scatter black mustard seed around this metallic instrument, any witch can be trapped.”

It is astonishing that some illustrious occultists are unaware that these witches can elude the law of universal gravity!

Although the notion may be unusual, we emphasize the idea that it is possible to transpose the physical body to the fourth dimension.

It is not at all strange that these harpies, having entered the unknown dimension with their physical bodies, can levitate and travel within seconds to any place in the world.

It is clear that they have secret formulas with which they can escape from the three dimensional world of Euclid.  In strictly occult terms, we can label these sinister creatures as black Jinns.

Indeed, the human organism offers amazing possibilities. Remember beloved readers, the execrable Celaeno and her filthy harpies, monsters with the necks and heads of women, horrifying fowls of the Strophades Islands of the Ionian Sea.

They are provided with hooked claws for hands and their faces are pale with a hunger that is never satisfied. They have the heads and necks of women who were beautiful maidens in the past but are now transformed into horrible furies who pollute everything they touch with their foul contagion.

The principal capital of these abominations is in Salamanca, Spain.  The famous Klingsor castle lies there, that hall of sorcery, the sanctuary of darkness suitably mentioned by Richard Wagner in his Parsifal.

Bless my soul, oh God, and hail Mary!  If people were told this, they would search for Klingsor castle through all the old streets of Salamanca.

However, it is well known by Gods and humans that the castle of the black grail is found in the land of Jinn, the unknown dimension.

On Tuesdays and Saturdays at midnight, these hags meet with their idlers to have orgies.

When one of these harpies has been trapped by people, she then gets a good tanning, thrashing, or beating from them.  Wretched people still do not know how to return good for evil.

It is necessary to be comprehensible, instead of getting stuck in the mire of infamy.  We must overcome these harpies with love, bravely confront the problem and admonish them with wisdom.

Judge not, that ye be not judged.  For with what judgment ye judge, ye shall be judged: and with what measure ye mete, it shall be measured to you again.

And why beholdest thou the mote that is in thy brother’s eye, but considerest not the beam that is in thine own eye?

Or how wilt thou say to thy brother, Let me pull out the mote out of thine eye; and, behold, a beam is in thine own eye?

Thou hypocrite, first cast out the beam out of thine own eye; and then shalt thou see clearly to cast out the mote out of thy brother’s eye.  - Matthew 7:1-5

He that is without sin among you, let him first cast a stone at her.  - John 8:7

However incredible it seems, it is good to know that many honorable and religious people carry the ego of sorcery within them.

In other words, we can state that honest and sincere people who in spite of knowing nothing about occultism, esotericism, etc. in their present existence, carry nonetheless within them the ego of sorcery.

It is obvious that this ego often travels through time and space to cause harm to others.

A fleeting interest in sorcery in any past life could have created such an ego.

This means that there are many people in the world who, without knowing it, unconsciously practice witchcraft.

Verily I say unto you that there are many devotees of the Path who also carry within themselves the ego of sorcery.

We conclude this present chapter by saying: “All human beings, although they are upon the path of the razor’s edge, are more or less black internally as long as they have not eliminated the pluralized ego.”

The Mystery of the Golden BlossomThis chapter is from The Mystery of the Golden Blossom (1971) by Samael Aun Weor. The print and ebook editions by Glorian Publishing (a non-profit organization) are illustrated to aid your understanding, and include features like a glossary and index. Buy the book, and you benefit yourself and others.

Quote of the Moment

"O shrewd businessman, do only profitable business: Deal only in that commodity which shall accompany you after death."

- Adi Granth, Sri Raga, M.1, p. 22

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