The Kala-Hamsa swan, perched upon a lotus flower, floats over the pure living waters. Kala-Hamsa means: "I Am He, I Am He, I Am He." In other words, we can say, "The Spirit of God floats upon the face of the waters."

Divinity breathes upon the sea of eternity. God is within our own selves, thus we can find God only within our own selves: "I Am He, I Am He, I Am He."

God is love. Love is found immanent and transcendent within each drop of the great ocean. God can only be found within sex and love. The swan represents love. Love can only be enlivened with love.

The swan was born in order to love. When one of a couple of swans dies, the other dies of sadness.

In Eden, swans assist at the table of the Angels. Ineffable elixirs, which the Gods drink in their diamantine cups, are elaborated within the immaculate, white craws of swans.

Marvelous are the combinations of this infinite substance. The semen that we carry within our sexual glands is this infinite substance of the great ocean. The multiple combinations of this infinite substance are transformed into continents filled with plants, flowers and fruits.

The multiple combinations of this infinite substance give rise to everything that is created: birds and monsters, human beings and beasts. Everything emerges from the seminal waters of Genesis. Love breathes upon those waters.

Parsifal, after having killed the swan in a wood near the castle of Monsalvat, remorsefully breaks his bow.

Leda and the swan remind us about the enchantments of love. The swan of love makes the waters of life fertile. The fire of love makes life sprout from within the great ocean. The water is the habitat of fire. The sexual fire is dormant within the pure living waters. Fire and water, united in a trance of love, originated the entire universe. The fire of love breathes within our seminal waters. The fire of love makes the waters of life fertile. The swan symbolizes love. The swan can only be fed with love. When one of a couple of swans dies, the other dies of sadness.

The Major Mysteries by Samael Aun Weor

This chapter is from The Major Mysteries (1956) by Samael Aun Weor.

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